Tszyan-Kanchzen: Melon-Flavored Cucumber and the Path to Rejuvenation

Anton Sheikh-Fedorenko
Mar 03, 2020
In our other posts, we described how Professor Luc Montagnier, as well as other scientists, demonstrated the possibility to transfer DNA information to water using an electromagnetic field. Much earlier, in the 1960s, a Soviet-Chinese medical doctor by the name of Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen, was already actually studying the transfer of genetic information between different biological species solely using an electromagnetic field. His research led him to the observation that DNA stores the genetic code that provides a link between generations, and that the electromagnetic field can change it. This post will describe some of the experiments he conducted along with the sensational results.


Experimental Setup Used


Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen developed a device, which he named “Biotron” that was capable of transferring DNA information from one living biological organism to another through an electromagnetic field. In essence, the “donor” organism was placed on one side of the chamber and the “acceptor” on the other side. During an experiment, the electromagnetic field would travel through the donor organism and then reach the acceptor (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1. Schematic representation of experimental setup: 1) electromagnetic field generator; 2) electromagnetic field propagation from left to right; 3) placement of donor organism; 4) placement of acceptor organism; and 5) chamber.



Experiment #1: Animal Study with Ducks & Chickens


These experiments were conducted in 1961 in Shenyang, China and the purpose was to see whether it was possible to transfer genetic information from ducks to chickens using an electromagnetic field. In the experimental protocol, ducks were used as donors and hatching chicken eggs were acceptors. A total of 1,100 eggs were used for the study – 500 eggs were treated and 600 were untreated (i.e. control group). Of the 500 treated eggs, 480 eggs hatched and of these, 80% had flat, duck-shaped heads, 90% had a shift in the position of the eye, and more than 25% had some webbing between the toes (Fig. 2). These changes were not observed in the control group. As a result, this study illustrated that it was possible to modify chicken eggs using electromagnetic waves carrying duck DNA information.

Fig. 2. Images obtained prior to and following treatment of chicken eggs with electromagnetic waves carrying duck DNA information: a) chicken eggs before treatment; b) hatched “chicken-duck” following treatment; and c) close-up of toes showing webbing for treated eggs.


Experiment #2: Plant Study with Wheat and Corn


These experiments were performed in 1979 in Russia and the purpose was to investigate whether it was possible to transfer genetic information from wheat to corn using an electromagnetic field. In the experimental setup, wheat seedlings were used as donors and sprouted corn grains were acceptors. The data showed that corn acquired the characteristics of wheat – among the 7,000 treated corn grains, more than 55% had side stems and more than 23% had special panicles (Fig. 3). In addition to a normal corn panicle, a unique spike was formed with grains resembling both corn and wheat. Furthermore, the treated corn was considered to be more resilient since yield increased by 30% compared to the control group. All the changes observed were passed on to subsequent generations and these experiments were carried out for 10 years. 


Fig. 3. The effects of transferring information from wheat to corn using an electromagnetic field: a) the development of side stems on corn; and b) grains resembling both corn and wheat.


Experiment #3: Plant Study with Melon and Cucumber


These experiments were conducted in 1979 in Russia and the purpose was to investigate whether it was possible to transfer genetic information from melon to cucumbers using an electromagnetic field. In the experimental setup, melon seedlings were used as donors and sprouted cucumber seeds were acceptors. A total of 8,000 cucumber seedlings were used – 4,000 were treated and 4,000 were untreated (i.e. control group). Of the treated cucumbers, 94% were egg-shaped. Additionally, the treated cucumbers had a melon taste to them. These changes were not observed in the control group. In terms of yield, there was a 40% increase for the treated group compared to the control. All observed changes were passed on to subsequent generations and these experiments were carried out for 15 years. 

 

Experiment #4: Plant Study with High-Yielding and Low-Yielding Wheat


These experiments were conducted in 1983 in Russia and the purpose was to increase the production of low-yielding wheat. In the experimental setup, seedlings from a high-yielding wheat variety were used as donors and germinated seeds of low-yielding wheat were acceptors. A total of 10,000 wheat seedlings were used – 5,000 were treated and 5,000 were untreated (i.e. control group). The results indicated that with respect to plant morphology and yield, there was no significant difference between the treated and control groups.


Experiment #5: Plant Study with Corn and Low-Yielding Wheat


These experiments were conducted in 1984 in Russia and the purpose was to increase the production of low-yielding wheat. In the experimental setup, corn seedlings were used as donors and germinated seeds of low-yielding wheat (the same type used in Experiment #4) were acceptors. A total of 8,000 wheat seedlings were used – 4,000 were treated and 4,000 were untreated (i.e. control group). The data illustrated that there was a 40% increase in yield for the treated group compared to the control. This change was passed on to subsequent generations.


Experiment #6: Animal Study with Diverse Edible Plants and Mice


These experiments were conducted in 1987 in Russia and the purpose was to rejuvenate the mice. In the experimental setup, a variety of young seedlings of edible plants (i.e. wheat germ, peas, corn, barley, and sorghum) were used as donors and mice (age 48 months) were acceptors. A total of 600 mice were used – 300 were treated and 300 were untreated (i.e. control group). Of the 300 treated mice, more than 60% of them ate more food, ran faster, and had smoother hair. Additionally, more than 30% of the treated mice had their sexual activity and reproductive function restored and their average life expectancy increased by 50% (after 1.5 years of experiment, 41% of the mice were still alive). With respect to the control group, only 3.7% of the mice maintained sexual activity and reproductive function, and only 2.7% remained alive after 1.5 years of the experiment. These results illustrate the ability to rejuvenate mice using the electromagnetic waves carrying information from diverse edible plants.


Experiment #7: Animal Study with Young and Old Mice


These experiments were conducted in 1987 in Russia and the purpose was to rejuvenate the old mice. In the experimental setup, young mice were used as donors and old mice (of the same species) were acceptors. Of the 300 treated mice, no improvements like the ones seen in Experiment #6 were observed. 


Experiment #8: Animal Study with Diverse Edible Plants and Mice (Biochemical Effect)


These experiments were conducted in 1992 in Russia and the purpose was to rejuvenate mice using electromagnetic waves carrying information from diverse edible plants and understand its biochemical effect. In the experimental setup, a variety of young seedlings of edible plants (i.e. wheat germ, peas, corn, barley, and sorghum) were used as donors and adult mice were acceptors. Biochemical analysis indicated that DNA synthesis of corneal cells increased by 50%, division of pathological cells decreased by 41%, Myelocyte DNA synthesis increased by 73%, and thyroid cell DNA synthesis increased by 66% for the treated group compared to the control.


What does this mean?


From these experiments, Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen concluded that it is possible to transfer information from one biological organism to another through an electromagnetic field. Additionally, he found that a change in the hereditary traits of the acceptor organism can only be generated if the donor is of a different species. With respect to rejuvenation, Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen showed that it is possible to rejuvenate a species using electromagnetic waves carrying information from various edible plants and that there is not only a physical effect but also a biochemical effect. In fact, using this rejuvenation technique, Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen treated many human patients (as well as himself) and saw that on average, the physiological age of the patient had reduced by five and a half years. 

Although further research is needed to investigate the underlying mechanism involved, the work conducted by Dr. Tszyan-Kanchzen supports the benefits of transferring information from plants using an electromagnetic field (e.g. infoceuticals) for both agriculture and medical purposes. In particular, using electromagnetic signatures show great promise as an alternative means to improve global food security as well as health.

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