Vitamin C

No spectrum visualisation available now
Primary Application
Imprint
For what
Immune and Lymphatic
Blood and Cardiovascular
Integumentary
Skeletal and Muscular
Source
Vitamins and Minerals
For whom
People
Vitamin C, ascorbic acid, is probably one of the most highly publicized, yet least understood, of all of the vitamins. Championed by Nobel laureate Linus Pauling, Ph.D., and advocated by many nutrition buffs, vitamin C is indeed a fascinating and important nutrient (or micronutrient) necessary for human life. Vitamin C helps protect cells and keep them healthy. It is also involved in the production of collagen, which maintains healthy connective tissues, important for the support and structure of tissues and organs including the skin, bones and blood vessels." Vitamin C helps with wound healing, and consuming vitamin C increases the amount of iron we can absorb from plant sources, such as kale, broccoli and sprouts. Vitamin C is one of many antioxidants that may protect against damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals, as well as toxic chemicals and pollutants like cigarette smoke. Research suggests that free radicals can build up and contribute to the development of health conditions such as cancer, heart disease and arthritis.